Tag Archives: #EFCC

My Dear Abdulrasheed Bawa – Osita Chidoka

Open Letter to EFCC Chairman

Congratulations on your appointment as EFFC Chairman. As somebody who shares some similarity with your trajectory, I want to publicly advise you as the euphoria of your appointment and the deluge of advice continue to come your way. Usually, I would have been critical of this appointment as it continues the profound disrespect and insensitivity to the constitutional provision on Federal Character. Since the inception of this administration appointments in the paramilitary, intelligence, police, and military organisations have been so lopsided but not my letter’s subject. I will continue that conversation at an appropriate place.

Today, I support the generational shift that your appointment represents. We should remove all the clauses in our laws that create an age barrier to executive positions. It is anachronistic and against the spirit of the Not Too Young to Run Act.

Your appointment is reminiscent of mine as Corps Marshal in 2007 when I was35 years. The difference with yours is that you came from within the organisation. The first challenge you will face as a young man is the difficulty your direct reports who are older and more experienced than you will have taking orders from you. They will pledge their loyalty, laugh with you but will be bitter and rightly so. Those who publicly try to belittle you or want to be the leaders of the opposition to you should be quickly excused from the organisation through transfer of service or termination if necessary. Do not try to convince or manage them. It won’t work.

They will try to do two things. First, expose you to public ridicule as an intemperate and inexperienced young man by pushing you to make rash decisions. If that does not work, they will try to show you ineffectual, incapable of taking decisions, and always waiting for the Attorney-General to direct or run to him for cover. You can avoid both by establishing a universe of principles that guide you. Still sleep over decisions. Learn to use weekly management meetings to get free advice and guidance on issues you are not conversant with. Don’t be shy to ask questions. I always ask my staff, “What should I say?” before I appear on any media or official function. You are the leader, not omniscient.

You are now Chief Executive. Past interactions and friendships should not cloud your actions. They may try to blackmail you. Don’t give in. Abdulrasheed the investigator is not the same as Abdulrasheed the Chairman. Always remember that and make it clear to your colleagues. A new Sherriff is in town.

Quickly set up a team to review the commission’s mission and the journey so far and develop a corporate road map for the future. If such a document already exists, the team should review it. Hire a world-class consultancy firm to guide the review and choose three countries you admire or those rated highly in preventing corruption and use them as your benchmark.

Continually benchmark your work. My mantra of Measure, Monitor, Improve is recommended. Relentlessly measure and monitor. Quantify always, as our culture is not a numerate one and our public service is weak in data collection and analysis. Train a small team to do that.

Do keep a diary. You will need it. I kept a diary but was not religious in updating it to my regret. President Reagan kept a diary daily for his eight years as President, so there is no excuse. Keep a copy of all the approvals you grant, and important circulars. Nigeria’s ruling and media elite are vicious. Be ready to defend yourself.

Dimension your time to 48 months. That way, you will realise that every four months is 10% of your time, and you need to work to achieve your road map within your first term debarring any changes. Time is your enemy. Don’t spend time celebrating. Don’t stand still while you are waiting for the roadmap. Move on to the tactical issues confronting you.

As a staff, you know all the murmuring of the junior and senior officers. Usually, they include the backlog of unpaid transfer allowances, late promotion, punitive postings and exclusion of other ethnic groups from core operational functions. Deal with them. You are too young to be burdened by the fault lines of a dying order. Successful organisations are inclusive, goal-oriented, merit-driven, and anchored on fairness.

Create opportunities to interact with staff. Invite them randomly to eat with you or travel with you so you can remain grounded. its lonely upstairs, especially if you are young.

Create a safe place for the female staff of your organisation. It is an issue. Please encourage them to speak out against abuse and gender discrimination. Remove all rules that discriminate against women and entrust them with operational roles. I believe you are disciplined don’t fall for their feminine wiles. Keep clear.

On the job, you have a decision to make, and history will guide you. How do you want to be remembered? I think you have an advantage of age, ICT knowledge, global training and on the job experience. I think you should embrace technology and work on digitising the commission you promised during your Senate clearance. Purge the commission of the police analogue and brute force mentality. Technology will make your investigating team productive and help in preventing corruption.

Do not be frightened by the plight of your predecessors. Be bold. Be guided by facts and data. Don’t make media show when you have no evidence. Strike like the MET police or the Singapore Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau, not the past Chairman’s unintelligent media posturing. Good investigating agencies don’t arrest people and start looking for evidence. Combine the boldness of Nuhu Ribadu and the meticulousness of DIG Lamorde as your guide.

Finally, the powers that be will use you. Be smart about how you go about it. Fairness is important. Use them too to get funding and support for your agency. Anchor your work with global institutions so you can use them as an excuse to ward off undue influence. The last for me: truly fight corruption. The war against corruption needs a sociological and philosophical underpinning. Lead that conversation.

Corruption is at the root of the state failure staring us on the face. We have to re-establish a fair compensation system; otherwise, the excluded will continue to seek ways to equalise those with unfair access to state resources. We must fight corruption.

Fight without fear or favour. Kick big and small men hard; you have enough time to make peace afterwards. It is better Nigerians fear than love you. Our love is worth nothing if you are judged incompetent.

Osita Chidoka
February 2021

Corruption: Buhari Deserves Credit For Diminishing Corruption In Public Service – Garba Shehu

The Buhari administration deserves credit for diminishing corruption in the public service and will continue to vigorously support prevention, enforcement, public education and enlightenment activities of anti-corruption agencies.

We are currently analyzing the sources of data used in arriving at the latest Transparency International (TI) report on Corruption Perceptions Index in Nigeria since by their own admission, they don’t gather their own data.

This report is not an accurate portrayal of the facts on ground.

In the coming days, the Government’s Technical Unit on Governance Research (TUGAR) will be providing more detailed information on the sources of the TI data.

While this is being awaited, the examination carried out on their 2019 report showed that 60 percent of their data was collected from businesses and other entities with issues bordering on transparency and the ease of doing business at the ports.

Although this is a government ready to learn from mistakes and make corrections, the economy of this country, in its fullness, is bigger than the sea ports we have.

We are also not unaware of the characters behind the TI in Nigeria whose opposition to the Buhari administration is not hidden.

We have repeatedly challenged TI to provide indices and statistics of its own to justify its sensational and baseless rating on Nigeria and the fight against corruption. We expect them to come clean and desist from further rehashing of old tales.

A Naira denominated review that excludes recoveries in Dollars, Pounds, Euro shows that a sum of N1.2tn was recovered by EFCC between 2009 — 2019. N939bn of that total was recovered between 2015 – 2019 with less than N300bn recovered in the first six years.

Additionally, preventative instruments deployed by this administration such as Treasury Single Account (TSA), Integrated Personnel and Payroll Information System (IPPIS) coverage expansion and the removal of 54,000 ghost workers from federal civil service saving us N200bn annually serve as evidence that perception is not reality.

Reality is based on verifiable facts and data. And any evidence-based analysis would prove that whether it is by prevention or punitive measures in recoveries and prosecution, this administration would be rising fast up these rankings rather than standing still.

Organizations should be factual in their analysis and be prepared to rely on inputs outside of sensational media reports and age-old narratives which have not been updated to reflect today’s reality in Nigeria concerning its globally-respected war on corruption.

In the existential fight against this multi-pronged malice and manifestations of corruption, President Muhammadu Buhari has avowed that he would take-no-prisoners, guided by respect for the rule of law.

We invite Nigerians to stand with an administration that has done so much on asset recovery, prosecution, legislation, political will and leadership by example in the fight against corruption.

Equally, we urge our friends in the media, development partners and the civil society organizations to continue to support efforts to strengthen accountability, transparency, ethical values and integrity in Nigeria’s public sector.

President Buhari has put his hand to the plough and will not relent in working with those passionate about the welfare, stability and prosperity of future generations to come in Nigeria.

Malam Garba Shehu, is the Senior Special Assistant to the President on Media & Publicity.

CORRUPTION: How Air Chiefs Diverted NAF Funds- EFCC Witness Testifies On Amosun

The trial of a former Chief of Air Staff, Air Marshal Adesola Amosu (retd) continued on January 18, 2021, before Justice Chukwujekwu Aneke of a Federal High Court, Ikoyi with a witness of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, EFCC further testifying against Amosu and two others on their complicity in the alleged diversion to personal use of about N21billion belonging to the Nigeria Air Force, NAF.

Amosu, alongside Air Vice Marshall Jacobs Adigun, a former NAF Chief of Accounts and Budget, and Air Commodore Gbadebo Owodunni, a former NAF Director of Finance and Budget, are standing trial on an amended 13-count charge. Their trial began in June 2016 before Justice Idris Mohammed, but was later reassigned to Justice Aneke following the elevation of Justice Mohammed to the Court of Appeal. They were re-arraigned in November 2018 and they pleaded “not guilty” to the charges.

Continuing with his examination-in-chief, Okechukwu Akubue, who is testifying as the first prosecution witness, narrated how public funds meant for the NAF were traced to the defendants.

Led in evidence by prosecuting counsel, Suleiman Suleiman, the witness, who is an EFCC operative, identified Exhibit A3 before the Court as the bank statement of the NAF Special Emergency Operations Account domiciled in Zenith Bank.

According to him, the bank statement was part of the responses to letters of investigation sent to several financial institutions by the EFCC.

Identifying Adigun and Owodunni as the signatories to the account as indicated by the bank mandate, he noted that the EFCC had in 2015 received intelligence report on the alleged fraud.

Narrowing down to the transaction of April 8, 2014 in the statement, Akubue noted that the entry was an inflow of N1billion from one of the NAF account domiciled in Skye Bank (now Polaris Bank).

He said: “The account where the money came from is also one of the accounts under investigation.

“One of the disbursements from the N1billion is the sum of N16, 980,000 on the 17th of April 2014 to a firm known as Delcon Installers Limited.

“We did further investigation of the company and we gathered that the money was not used to procure services for NAF.”

Akubue further highlighted the transaction of the 28th of August 2014, noting that “a credit sum of N1billion came from NIMASA”.

He explained further that in the course of investigation, the investigating team came across a Memorandum of Understanding, MoU between NIMASA and NAF for the protection of Nigeria’s waterways, which prompted the credit of N1billion from NIMASA to NAF.

“In our investigation, we came across a debit of N4, 801,549 withdrawn on 2nd September 2014 from this inflow, into the account of Hebron Housing and Property,” Akubue said, adding that the company was linked to the second defendant “by way of ownership” and was used to “purchase assets on behalf of the defendants”.

The case has been adjourned till 19th January, 2021 for “continuation of trial”.

Breaking: EFCC Grills Babatunde Fowler Over Fraud Allegations Against Alpha Beta

The EFCC Grills The Federal Executive Chairman, Federal Inland Revenue Service, Babatunde Fowler.

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission is presently interrogating a former Chairman of the Federal Inland Revenue Service, Babatunde Fowler, over the N100 billion tax evasion allegations levelled against a tax firm, Alpha Beta Consulting.

Fowler, who was also a former Chief Executive Officer, Lagos State Internal Revenue Service, responded to an invitation from the EFCC on Monday.

A former Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer, Alpha Beta Consulting, Dapo Apara, had accused the firm of tax fraud to the tune of N100bn.

In a petition to the EFCC in 2018, Apara stated that Alpha Beta, the firm given exclusive rights to monitor and collect Internally Generated Revenue on behalf of the Lagos Government, “has become an avenue for official corruption of government officials, a conduit pipe for massive money-laundering scheme, tax evasion, among other vices.”

In the petition which was written by his lawyer, Adetunji Shoyoye and Associates, the ex-CEO claimed that the fraud had been covered by powerful politicians in the state.

The petition signed by Adetunji Adegboyega on behalf of the law firm, read in part, “Over the years the company has been protected and shielded by some powerful politicians and people in the society which made them to always boast of being untouchable, but our client, feeling the need not to keep quiet again and strengthened by his belief in the fact that the government of President Muhammadu Buhari is keen on fighting corruption, which has been the bane of our country, is of the firm belief that it’s time to expose and open the can of worms called Alpha Beta Consulting.”

The EFCC spokesman, Wilson Uwujaren, confirmed that Fowler was with the commission.

“Yes, Fowler responded to an invitation this morning. I believe he is still here,” he explained.

Uwujaren, however, did not comment on the investigation.

EFCC Probe: I’m Having No Regrets For Chairing Panel To Probe Magu – Justice Salami

Justice Ayo Salami, Chairman of the presidential panel investigating Ibrahim Magu, the suspended Acting Chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), says he does not regret his appointment to serve on the panel.

Magu is being investigated over allegations of abuse of office and mismanagement of recovered assets from May 2015 to May 2020 — the time he acted as Acting Chairman of the anti-graft agency.

Magu’s lawyers have always disagreed with the panel. But in a memo on Tuesday, Salami accused the lawyers of planting reports in the media that he regrets chairing the panel.

Justice Salami said in the memo that,“The reports were a figment of the wild imagination of the reporter, the two lawyers quoted as his sources and the medium that published the story,”

“There was no time anything near the unthinkable scenario painted in the false story occurred in any meeting between myself and the lawyers to Magu or any other person, for that matter, since the Judicial Commission of Inquiry began its sittings.

“I have no cause to express any regret over my Chairmanship of the Commission, not to talk of betraying any form of emotion before anyone about it. I see my appointment to serve as the Chairman of the Commission of Inquiry as an honour and call to service, thus my decision to accept diligently and patriotically discharge this responsibility.

“I have never appointed any of the two lawyers or any other person(s) to speak on my behalf as I can express myself without recourse to the lawyers of the persons we are probing. As an eminent jurist, who retired as the President of the Court of Appeal, I have handled much more complex cases than the current one before the Commission. There is no doubt that the false reports were aimed at causing mischief and tarnishing my hard-earned reputation and integrity. I remain resolute and committed to the service of the nation and ready to champion the ideals of justice and fairness.

“I want to point out that such wild claims against me and the Commission are not strange to me, given the manner in which the lawyers to Magu have been carrying on in the conduct of their client’s case before the Commission. Planting such lies in the media about proceedings at the panel has been their pastime. They believe that it is by engaging in such media propaganda against the Commission that their client can be easily absolved of the various allegations that have been brought against him.”

Asking Nigerians to disregard the report, the retired president of the appeal court said the “lies  and blackmail” will not deter him and other members of the panel from discharging their duty and mandate.

He said in conclusion, that the panel which he chairs will continue its investigation of the allegations against Magu with a view to unearthing the truth and ensuring that justice is done.

Source: Political Digest.

Prof. Sagay Refers To The Ongoing Amendment of The EFCC Act As Fraud

Professor Itse Sagay (SAN), the Chairman, Presidential Advisory Committee Against Corruption (PACAC), the renowned constitution guru, calls on Nigerians and the members of the National assembly against the amendment of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission Act.

The call was in a statement signed by Sagay, and released by the Communication Unit of the committee, where he said the planned amendment was part of “an on-going very sinister and dangerous attempt to demolish the anti-corruption infrastructure of Nigeria and return it to the situation it was in during the dark days before 2015.

Prof. Sagay added that those behind it “are the representatives of the corrupt establishment that brought this country to its knees and subjected us to humiliation as a result of an extremely negative reputation internationally”.

The controversial bill seeks to weaken the EFCC and its officials and confer an enormous power of control of the anti-graft agency on the office of the Attorney General of the Federation and Minister of Justice.

Although, Sagay did not mention the name of the incumbent AGF, Abubakar Malami (SAN), as the sponsor of the controversial bill, he tackled the minister for what he described as his proclivity for aborting criminal cases in favour of major political and governmental figures.

He noted that the draft bill which intended to repeal the EFCC Establishment Act 2004, was being sponsored by those that were “too ashamed to put their names to the draft bill being circulated”.

Without mentioning the names of the alleged sponsors of the bill, Sagay described them as the “enemies of Nigeria”.

Malami, whose memo to the President, Major General Muhammadu Buhari (retd), triggered the ongoing probe of the suspended Acting Chairman of EFCC, Mr Ibrahim Magu, by the Justice Ayo Salami-led panel for various allegations of corruption, abuse of office, and insubordination, has been linked to the controversial bill in the media.

Citing various provisions of the bill, Sagay said it would eliminate the anti-graft agency’s “freedom and autonomy” and replace it with “an entity under the complete control of the Minister of Justice and Attorney-General”.

The Professor further added that the proposed bill if passed, would effectively turn the commission into a department in the Federal Ministry of Justice.

Corruption: A Parasite That Retards Collective National Development

Corruption: A Parasite That Retards Collective National Development – Mukhtar Garba Kobi

It is unarguable true that the problem of corruption has being in existence since time immemorial. Corruption is frequent in each and every society and it happens almost everyday. It has several shapes as well as various effects but that varies from one society to another, it deals with subverting public fund, etiolating morals, defalcating staff’s benefits, absurdifying tax & fines, political misconduct and decadences in spheres of human endeavours.

The wound of corruption has eaten deep down the flesh and melted in veins of fellow countrymen. It usually starts from home between husband and wife, mother and children, down to entire society. It generates a lack of transparency and a lack of control by supervisory institutions, corruption paves way for a non transparent functioning of social, political and economic sectors.

Corruption is the dishonest or fraudulent conduct by those in position of power or followers which typically involves bribery. According to Morris (1991), corruption can be seen as the illegitimate use of power to benefit a private interest. It also entails offering of bribe to an official so that the truth of a situation will be hidden. It covers the embezzlement of public funds for personal use, giving a token to scale a course by students, offering some amount to skip paying actual fine to security agents and any act that is considered to be criminal in nature which is contrary to the laws enshrined by code or constitution. In 2001, Nigeria was ranked the second most corrupt nation in the world out of 91 countries, second only to Bangladesh.

Recently in 2019, Transparency International ranked Nigeria as 146th out of 180 countries surveyed on corruption with 26% corruption index. This reveals that level of corruption has mercilessly stabbed Nigeria deep to a state of unending stupor.

Furthermore, corruption retards economic growth of a country, slows down business operation, blocks employment opportunities and halts investors from foreign countries in investing. The wider society is persuaded when the gravity of corruption is high, the executive arm of government tends to not bring policies and programmes for development, judiciary will then be chocked with angry and money egocentric judges which makes citizens lose confidence in them.

The legislative arm can then be taciturn and passive by not passing bills that could reduce burdens and dilapidated infrastructures. The level of corruption in Nigeria hurts a lot of people as money which supposed to be used in purveying developmental projects to better lives is channeled into the pockets of selected few.

The sad part of it is that the current Nigerian government and the ruling party turned to redemption camp; where corrupt labeled politicians absquatulate to it, then those charges on them are being dropped unquestionably.

The stain of corruption did not spare anti-graft agencies that are saddled with the responsibilities of antagonizing corruption, as the former chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission EFCC, Ibrahim Lamurde was accused of fraudulently diverting one trillion naira recovered from corrupt convicts by the commission (Adeyemi, 2016). Recently, the embattled Acting Chairman of the commission, Ibrahim Magu was also accused of corruption, diversion of recovered loots, insubordination and abuse of office which led to his unexpected suspension as the Acting Chairman of the commission. This is unimaginable as those appointed to fight corruption in the country are also found to be guilty of the same problem they are suppose to be fighting for.

Laconically, corrupt related malfeasance varies from one country to another, in most developing countries; the cases of corruption are usually common. Some causes of corruption includes GREED which has led to major crisis in almost all developing countries and in Nigeria in particular; Leaders that garnered too much wealth still quest to remain on power because their money ego is insatiable.

Secondly, UNEMPLOYMENT; Youth that are the strength of the nation are unemployed, the hike of idleness triggers many into internet fraud (cybercrime), sexual harassment by male managers in companies in order to reinstate female staff.

Thirdly, POVERTY; According to international standard, which states that a person is said to be poor when he or she lives under $1.25 (which is equivalent to N475) per day, poverty has pushed many into thuggery, cybercrime, and other heinous acts in order to better their lives.

In fact, corruption is a multidimensional process, it benefits the giver of the bribe, the receiver and both are aware of the consequences while others are doing it unknowingly.

Some countries have recorded great success in dealing with corruption, such that anyone caught the repercussion is to be liquidated or life imprisonment.

There are several ways to curb corruption and they includes; Reinforcement of moral compass in which government should help parents in by rewarding honest citizens whether adults or teenagers, also by declaring free education, free healthcare, taking under age persons that are found guilty to rehabilitation homes, etc.

Similarly, leaders can help in fighting corruption by serving as good example to citizens; this can be achieved by judiciously applying stipulated punishment to anyone irrespective of whoever he or she is. Thirdly, making anti-graft agencies or commissions independent from government control, by giving them the wherewithal to charge all whether in ruling or opposition parties.

Lastly, citizens should be allowed to have access to information concerning country’s finance, this will help in enhancing accountability.

In conclusion, if these steps are sternly taken and applied the preponderant cases of corruption would be eradicated and lastly become history.

By: Mukhtar Garba Kobi.

Trade Union Congress SHOULD PARTNER THE PRESIDENT AGAINST CORRUPTION, NOT STAMPEDE HIM – Presidency

The Senior Special Assistant to the President
on Media & Publicity, Malam Garba Shehu, yesterday, in a swift response to planned ‘Nationwide Protest’, said:

“The reported plan by the Trade Union Congress (TUC) to embark on a nationwide protest over the alleged President Buhari’s “inaction over the high-level of corruption uncovered at the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC), the Nigeria Social Insurance Trust Fund (NSITF) and the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC)” is ill advised and totally uncalled for, considering that there are ongoing investigations in the cases by both the Executive and Legislative arms of government.

These processes must be allowed to run their full courses.

It is against the norm in a democratic society as well as the natural laws of justice to seek “action,” meaning punishment against offenders before proper investigation, trial and conviction.

The President has made it clear that the allegations that have surfaced clearly “constitute a breach of trust” and as the investigations take hold and close out, all those found wanting will face the wrath of the law.”

Malam Garba further states that:

“The TUC, as an enlightened group of labour Unionists, should indeed voice their indignation whenever such acts are being unearthed.

However the expectation will be for it to also raise the bar higher, in terms of the debate concerning the impact of such allegations on our ability, to create and retain employment, attract investment, improve the living conditions of its members and citizens, and how a preponderance of these heinous crimes decimates any gains being made in other spheres.

The world is confronted with a global public health crisis, decline in economic growth, and expanding areas of conflict by non-state actors.”

“All these ills in their singular or combined form are consuming every nation. Nigeria is no exception; we must hold the line and lock arms that way we rid ourselves of these existential issues whilst we grapple with those that are our own homegrown problems.

This administration is committed to doing just that, and organizations like the TUC should be extending a hand in supporting such a fight that is in our collective interest.” He concluded.

Update: Malami Frustrating DIEZANI’s Extradition Says Magu

The suspended Acting Chairman of EFCC, Ibrahim Magu accuses the Attorney General of the Federation, Abubakar Malami (SAN) of frustrating the extradition of Diezani Allison-Madueke and other suspects.

The embattled acting Chairman of the Economic and Financial Commission (EFCC), Ibrahim Magu, has responded to allegations that he frustrated the extradition of a former minister of petroleum, Diezani Alison-Madueke and other fugitives to face trial in Nigeria.

Rejecting the allegation, Mr Magu told the presidential probe panel investigating allegations of corruption against him, that it was his accuser, Abubakar Malami, who was actually frustrating the extradition of the fugitives.

In the report, originally published by the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) and republished by several newspapers, Mr Magu was accused of refusing to cooperate with crime-fighting authorities in the United Kingdom to facilitate the return of Mrs Alison-Madueke to to the country to face corruption charges.

The report also claimed that Mr. Magu has refused to provide documentary evidence that would make the office of the Attorney General of the Federation commence the process of extraditing Mrs Alison-Madueke.

However, Mr Magu’s response to the presidential probe panel, shows that he denied refusing to share information with the National Crime Agency (NCA) of the United Kingdom. As he said: “The NCA still shares critical information with the Commission and conducts joint operations with the Commission under the Combined Inter-Agency Task Force (CIATF) and also directly. Classified documents in this regard can be produced for sighting on request and with the consent of the NCA.

The Commission is also jointly working with the NCA on several cases including the Diezani Allison-Madueke cases and all the Mutual Legal Assistance (MLA) requests on these cases are passed to the NCA and the Crown Prosecution Services through the Central Authority Unit (CAD) of the Ministry of Justice contrary to the allegations of the HAGF,” Mr Magu wrote.

He added that following the delay by UK authorities to charge Mrs Alison-Madueke, the EFCC wrote to the authorities in the country through the AGF requesting the extradition of the former petroleum minister so she can face pending charges in Nigeria.

Magu also added that Mr Malami has yet to communicate with the commission about the position of UK authorities on the request it made.

Contrary to the claim made against him by Mr Malami, the EFCC former Acting Chairman told the probe panel that under his leadership, “the EFCC maintained a good working relationship with the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation which recently acknowledged this relationship by commending the Commission publicly and on record.”

He added that apart from the request for the extradition of Mrs Alison-Madueke, the EFCC has made several requests through the AGF for the extradition of high profile Nigerian fugitives and that Mr Malami has yet to respond to any of the requests. “Some of these fugitives include Robert John Oshodin who laundered millions of United States Dollars on behalf of former National Security Adviser (NSA) Colonel Sambo Dasuki (Rtd), former Special Adviser to the President on Niger Delta and Coordinator of the Amnesty Programme Mr Kingsley Kuku and Hima Aboubakar who was criminally indicted by the investigation of arms procurement conducted under the former NSA Colonel Sambo Dasuki (Rtd).

Attached and marked as Annexure 32 (a)-(e) are copies of the extradition requests of these fugitives. “The Commission also forwarded a Mutual Legal Assistance request to the AGF for onward transmission to the authorities of the British Virgin Island through a letter dated 9th September, 2019 wherein the Commission requested for critical information in respect of the P&ID case but the Commission is yet to receive any response from the office of the AGF,” Mr Magu wrote.

Mr Malami did not respond to calls made to him Tuesday morning seeking his comments for this story. Last week, Mr. Malami announced Mr. Magu’s suspension following President Muhammadu Buhari’s approval. Prior to his suspension he was arrested and brought before the probe panel headed by Justice Ayo Salami, a former President of the Court of Appeal.

Mr Magu is currently being investigated over allegations of corruption and insubordination levelled against him by Mr Malami.

After his arrest, allegations that Mr Magu diverted billions of naira gotten from recovered funds, as well as the interests accrued from the funds, were circulated and published on various media platforms. He rejected the charges saying all recovered assets are intact and can be accounted for.

Sources: News Agency of Nigeria and Premium Times

President Buhari Directs Speedy And Coordinated Investigation On NDDC – Presidency

Mr. President directs for speedy investigation of the NDDC according to a statement released by the Senior Special Assistant to the President
On Media & Publicity, Malam Garba Shehu.

The statement reads:

“President Muhammadu Buhari has given directives for better coordination among security and investigating agencies with the National Assembly to ensure that the administration’s effort to bring sanity, transparency and accountability to the management of the large amount of resources dedicated to development of the Niger Delta sub-region is not derailed.

In his reaction to the unfolding drama, which include attacks and counter attacks between and around persons, institutions, and the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC), President Buhari expressed his strong determination to get to the root of the problem undermining the development of the Niger Delta and its peoples in spite of enormous national resources voted year after year for this singular purpose.”

The Presidential spokesman further said:

“According to the directive, auditing firms and investigative agencies working in collaboration with National Assembly Committees to resolve the challenges in the NDDC must initiate actions in a time-bound manner and duly inform the Presidency of the actions being taken.

The President also directed timely sharing of information and knowledge in a way to speedily assist the administration to diagnose what had gone wrong in the past and what needs to be done to make corrections in order to return the NDDC to its original mandate of making life better for people in Niger Delta.”

“President Buhari said the administration wants to bring about “rapid, even and sustainable development to the region.”

The President gave firm assurance that his administration would put in place a transparent and accountable governance framework, not only in the NDDC but in all other institutions of government.”He concluded.